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Hello! This is super rare opportunity for Utah, UMFA is hosting The British Passion for Landscape: Masterpieces from national Museum Wales. Here you'll be able to experience legendary artists like Claude Monet right here in Salt Lake City!

Claude Monet, Charing Cross Bridge, 1902. Oil on canvas, 25 3/4 x 32 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 2483). Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Salt Lake City – A rare gathering of stunning British landscape paintings and photographs by legendary artists opens at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) on Saturday, August 29 for a 15-week fall run. The UMFA is one of four exclusive U.S. museums to host The British Passion for Landscape: Masterpieces from National Museum Wales, and the only venue in the western United States.

More than 60 oil and watercolor paintings and photographs, drawn from the remarkable collections of Amgueddfa Cymru–National Museum Wales, chart the rise of landscape art in Britain through works from such masters as J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, Claude Monet, Thomas Gainsborough and Richard Wilson.

“Not since the UMFA hosted Monet to Picasso from the Cleveland Museum of Art in 2008 have Utah audiences had access to artists of such art historical significance here at home,” says Gretchen Dietrich, UMFA’s executive director. “This exhibition gives Utahns a unique opportunity to experience Turner, Constable and Monet right here in Salt Lake City.”

The exhibition is organized by the American Federation of Arts and Amgueddfa Cymru–National Museum Wales. Curators are Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art at Yale University, and Oliver Fairclough, Keeper of Art at National Museum Wales. The UMFA will offer several free public programs in conjunction with the exhibition, including a lecture by Barringer on Thursday, October 22, at 7 pm.

The British Passion for Landscape begins during the Industrial Revolution and explores the eras of romanticism, impressionism and modernism through the postmodern and post-industrial imagery of today. The work references both the poetry of landscape and the environmental threats posed by industrialism—key themes that persist in British art today and that will resonate with Utah audiences.

“Utah and Great Britain share some unique cultural ties and qualities,” Dietrich says. “Both places are famous for stunning scenery celebrated by many great artists over time, and both know the tensions that can arise between a bucolic and an industrial vision of the land. On a more personal level, many Utahns’ cultural roots are in Britain, so these places and their history will resonate with many in our region.”

Visitors can explore the landscape tradition more deeply, through examples made closer to home, elsewhere in the Museum this fall. Constructing the Utah Landscape, on view concurrently with The British Passion for Landscape, guides visitors of all ages in a hands-on exploration of landscape technique. The interactive exhibition, on view in the UMFA’s Emma Eccles Jones Education Gallery, showcases more than a dozen objects from the UMFA’s Art of Utah and the West collection, including works by Maynard Dixon, LeConte Stewart and V. Douglas Snow.

“Whether you’re an art historian, an artist yourself, or someone who is visiting an art museum for the very first time, you can immerse yourself in truly masterful works of great beauty and emotional depth that will resonate with your own personal experiences of the land around you,” says Luke Kelly, the Museum’s curator of antiquities and the curator in charge of The British Passion for Landscape’s installation in Utah.

Claude Gellee, Le Lorrain, Landscape with St. Philip Baptizing the Eunuch, 1678. Oil on canvas, 34 5/8 x 56 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 4). Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

*Evelyn Dunbar, Baling Hay, 1940. Oil on canvas, 18 1/16 x 24 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 29396) © National Museum Wales Collection. Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

George Clausen, Apple Blossom, 1885. Oil on millboard, 9 13/16 x 8 15/16 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 174). Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Thomas Gainsborough, Rocky Wooded Landscape with Rustic Lovers, Herdsman, and Cows, 1771–74. Oil on canvas, 48 7/8 x 58 3/4 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 22780). Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Thomas Jones, The Bard, 1774. Oil on canvas, 46 1/6 x 66 1/8 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 85). Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Joseph Mallord William Turner, Flint Castle, 1835. Watercolor with scratching out and sponging out over pencil on paper, 10 7/8 x 15 13/16 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 1757). Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Joseph Mallord William Turner, The Storm, 1840–45. Oil on canvas, 12 3/4 x 21 1/8 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 509). Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Henry Clarence Whaite, The Storm, 1865 and later. Oil on canvas, 28 1/8 x 9 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 19779). Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

John Constable, A Cottage in a Cornfield, 1817. Oil on canvas, 12 3/8 x 10 1/4 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 486). Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

*Oskar Kokoschka, London, Waterloo Bridge, 1926. Oil on canvas, 35 1/8 x 51 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 2162). © 2014 Fondation Oskar Kokoschka / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ProLitteris, Zürich. Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Richard Wilson, Dover Castle, ca. 1746–47. Oil on canvas, 35 5/8 x 46 in. National Museum Wales (NMW A 66). Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Sponsorship

The exhibition is organized by the American Federation of Arts and Amgueddfa Cymru–National Museum Wales. The exhibition tour and catalogue are generously supported by the JFM Foundation, Mrs. Donald M. Cox and the Marc Fitch Fund. In-kind support is provided by Barbara and Richard S. Lane and Christie’s.

Presenting sponsors of the exhibition at the UMFA are the Katherine W. Dumke and Ezekiel R. Dumke Jr. Special Exhibition Endowment, the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation and the Sam and Diane Stewart Family Foundation. Major sponsors are the Willard L. Eccles Charitable Foundation, the John W. and Helen B. Jarman Family Fine Arts Endowment, MINI of Murray and Marva and John Warnock. Supporting sponsors include Big-D Construction, Merit Medical Systems, Inc. and Susan and Jim Swartz. Media sponsor is KUED, and community partner is The King’s English Bookshop.

***GIVEAWAY***

We'll be giving away a five passes! Leave a comment below about your favorite British artist. Be sure to enter on our Instagram account as well for extra entries. Ends September 19th at Midnight.

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This post is sponsored, but The Salt Project's opinions are 100% our own.
Hours
Free Days : Admission is free to all visitors on first Wednesdays and third Saturdays, thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts and Parks Program.
From August 29–December 13, 2015, while The British Passion for Landscape: Masterpieces from National Museum Wales is on view, UMFA general admission prices are $14 for adults and $12 for seniors and youth.
Patrons who qualify for free admission will continue to receive this benefit: UMFA members; children ages 0-5; University of Utah students, staff and faculty; Utah public college students; and military families.
$5 After 5 : Admission will be $5 after 5 pm every Wednesday, except the first Wednesday of the month, which is always free all day.
Helpful Tips

FREE Public Programming

  • Chamber Music Series
    • Wednesday, September 2 | 7 pm
  • Third Saturday for Families: Make a Cyanometer
    • Saturday, September 19 | 1-4 pm
  • An Evening with Mr. Turner
    • Wednesday, September 30
  • Museum admission | 5–8 pm | $5
    • Film screening | 7 pm | FREE
  • Open House for Teachers, Education Students and Their Families
    • Wednesday, October 14 | 4-7pm | FREE for teachers and their families
  • Chamber Music Series
    • Wednesday, October 21 | 7 pm | FREE
  • Curator Talk: Tim Barringer
    • Thursday, October 22 | 7-9 pm
  • Museum admission | 5-7 pm | FREE
    • Evening for Educators: The British Passion for Landscape:
  • Masterpieces from National Museum Wales
    • Wednesday, November 4 | 5:30-8:30 pm | FREE for teachers
  • Chamber Music Series
    • Wednesday, October 21 | 7 pm

The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to inspire critical dialogue and illuminate the role of art in our lives. General admission during The British Passion for Landscape: Masterpieces from National Museum Wales (August 29-December 13, 2015) is $14 adults, $12 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, public higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks Program, free admission is offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

Follow #BritishLandscapes @utahmuseumfinearts on Facebook, @umfa on Twitter and @utahmuseumoffinearts on Instagram; or subscribe to the Museum’s e-mail newsletter at umfa.utah.edu/umfa_updates.

Whitney Jones Wed, 09/16/2015 - 23:38

We've never been to this museum. It would be an amazing experience for our whole family!

Laura Thu, 09/17/2015 - 09:17

It's a toss up between Turner and Constable. Turner has that amazing drama and emotion that captivates but the detail in Constable's work is amazing. I love how he elevates the life of the country worker to something noble.

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